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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ treatments evolve over 20 years, but cancer death rates vary little
    Treatment patterns for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) have shifted since the 1990s, with more U.S. women opting for lumpectomy in combination with radiation rather than single-breast mastectomy, according to a study. But the researchers also found an increased tendency for women to seek removal of both breasts, despite their analysis that cancer survival rates remained similar regardless of the form of treatment.

  • When should pediatric residents consult supervisors on issues that come up after hours?
    While resident physicians responsible for the care of hospital patients are always able to call a supervising senior physician for advice on handling situations that may come up, which situations require immediate consultation and which can wait until the next day can sometimes be unclear. A new study finds significant discrepancies between pediatric residents and supervising physicians regarding when supervisors should be called to help with specific after-hours situations.

  • Magnet hospitals better patient experiences may positively enhance reimbursement
    A new study shows that Magnet hospitals nationally accredited for nursing excellence have higher patient ratings of care than other hospitals. The study suggests that hospitals seeking to improve patient satisfaction, and qualify for new financial incentives, would be well advised to consider investing in nursing excellence.

  • Scientists pave way for diamonds to trace early cancers
    Physicists have devised a way to use diamonds to identify cancerous tumors before they become life threatening. Their findings reveal how a nanoscale, synthetic version of the precious gem can light up early-stage cancers in non-toxic, non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans.

  • Adoption of streamlined breast cancer treatment has stagnated, study finds
    It was hoped that the development of accelerated partial breast irradiation would increase the number of early-stage breast cancer patients getting radiation treatment. A new study, however, has found that adoption of the technique has stagnated -- and many women still aren't getting the radiation treatment that could save their lives.

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